Nowadays,the growth of technology is at its peak.Researchers at the Human Media Lab at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, have developed a life-sized hologram-like telepod that uses Microsoft’s Kinect System and a cylindrical display for  live, 3D videoconferencing.The system, called “TeleHuman 3D video conferencing”.Unlike most holography-like projections, TeleHuman accurately preserves motion parallax— the changing appearance of an object as we move around it.  “We always get a good view of the person as we walk 360 degrees around the display”.At present, Telehuman 3D video conferencing is the most sophisticated technology available for communication.It is a promising technology in the field of communication.

              A Queen’s University researcher has created a Star Trek-like human-scale 3-D video conferencing pod that allows people in different locations to video conference as if they were standing in front of each other.The TeleHuman has been designed with videoconferencing, teaching and medical work in mind.

Image

Researchers at the Human Media Lab at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, have developed a life-sized hologram-like telepod that uses Microsoft’s Kinect System and a cylindrical display for live, 3D videoconferencing.The system, called “TeleHuman,” allows two people to simply stand in front of their own pods and talk to 3D hologram-like images of each other. An array of six Kinect sensors mounted at the top ofthe display capture track 3D video and convert it into the lifesize image.

             The TeleHuman is a life-size video conferencing display pod which uses ten Microsoft Kinectsensors to help “beam” your image into another pod, enabling 3D chat between two people as if they were both in the same room.

             Microsoft’s kinetic sensor motion is very popular and its varied abilities(making of Star Wars characters) are certainly being exploited.Now a series of sensors find themselves attached to the TeleHuman.

             The TeleHuman is a cylindrical pod that stands just under two-meters tall and has a 3D projector hidden inside its base. This projects your image onto a convex mirror, which then reflects it ontothe wrap-around acrylic screen.

             It’s a complete 360-degree representation too, enabling the viewer to walk around the TeleHumanas they would if the person were really in the room, and although it’s not actually holographic, it looks exactly how we imagine that technology to appear.There are six Kinect sensors mounted around the top of the TeleHuman, which capture yourposition, then another four are placed around the room to form a “square,” and they record yourback and side view to complete the 3D picture cameras & sensors.

Image

TeleHuman was built primarily with existing hardware, including a 3D projector installed at thebase of the 1.8 meter-tall translucent acrylic cylinder and a convex mirror.The researchers used the same pod to create another application called BodiPod, which presents an interactive 3D anatomical model of the human body. Through gestures and speech control, the model can be explored 360 degrees; and when people approach the pod, they can wave their hands to peel off layers of human tissue.While 3-D holographic video is not a new technology (Cisco and Musion Systemscreated an on-stage holographic video conference 5 years ago), TeleHuman demonstrates that it can be done for a lot cheaper using the versatile Kinect platform and off-the-shelf hardware.

There are two main components to the system: the cylinder itself, which features a special display and contains an internal projection mechanism, and a set of cameras that track and capture our position as we communicate with our conversation partner.

Hologram

              Image

             There are two main components to the system: the cylinder itself, which features a special display and contains an internal projection mechanism, and a set of cameras that track and capture our position as we communicate with our conversation partner.

           The Human Media Lab team started with a hollow, cylindrical display that’s made of  and mounted on top of a wooden base. A stereoscopicDepthQprojector, along with anNvidia 3DVision Kit, is located at the bottom of the base, and aconvex mirroris installed at thetop.

  Shooting upward, the projector beams video of your conversationpartner into the mirror,which then beams the video back onto the display.

                 With the help of the embedded Kinect technology and distortion correction, TeleHuman projects aholograph-like image of a person onto the interior of its cylindrical display. And the structure is alittle more than 6.5 feet tall, making it possible to project most people in life size.

                 But that’s just the display portion of the system. TeleHuman is two-way, interactive technology, so it also needs to capture image movement as well

                 As we walk around the display, talking with our partner, TeleHuman tracks our position andcaptures our image with 10 different Microsoft Kinect sensors, each containing a built-in camera.Six Kinects line the top of the pod, tracking our position around the cylinder and capturing front-facing images. The other four Kinects are arranged in a square around us, about 8 feet away from the pod. These capture your side and rear views.

“The advantage of the pod being in cylindrical form  is that it’s essentially a flat display curved in one dimension, which is exactly the dimension we’re walking in,” Vertegaal said. “We always get agood view of the person as we walk 360 degrees around the display.”

While TeleHuman doesn’t use holographic technology, its results still looks like a hologram. To this extent, TeleHuman is a major design win as current holographic systems can’t match the promise of their sci-fi inspirations.

                           Image

Unlike most holography-like projections, TeleHuman accurately preserves motion parallax— the changing appearance of an object as we move around it. And this is an important development in terms of social interactions. In its studies, the Human Media Lab team discovered that real-world-accurate, 360-degree views are integral to how we share ourselves with each other.

             “Communication breaks down even with a subtle little thing,” Vertegaal said. “When you thinkabout preserving human communication, it’s more about what you leave out rather than what we add.With this system,we are trying to leave as little as possible”

              The key advantage over flat displays is that the 3D image is visible 360 degrees around the pod, the person can walk around it to see the other person’s side or back.

              So, the TeleHuman brings use one step closer to making our sci-fi communication dreams a reality,but there are a couple of drawbacks. First, one still has to wear 3D glasses to see the image in three dimensions, which will dim the image even more; and second, it’s quite expensive.

                         Image

Professor Roel Vertegaal, Director of the Human Media Lab, told Wired.com that a “massproduction” TeleHuman would cost around $5,000 — with at least $1,500 of that being taken up bythe ten Kinect sensors — and as you’d need one for each person taking part in the conversation,that’s a big investment.However, given that the parts used are almost all commercially available, it may not be that long until the price drops to something at least slightly more reasonable.

              In future 3D video conferencing will be a great successfull.Eventhough its very expensive now,it will become one of the most common mode of communication in the coming era.It completely eliminates the absence of our beloved ones.

Advertisements